A Master Stroke: Which Golfers Have Earned the Most from the Masters?

Mark Fordham
By Mark Fordham
 |  3 mins
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A Master Stroke: Which Golfers Have Earned the Most from the Masters?

The Masters is perhaps the most prominent and prestigious event in the golfing calendar, with competitors battling it out for the green jacket that earns them lifelong glory – and a combined $11.5 million in prize money. And with the latest edition just around the corner, we’re sure to see an exhibition of immense quality on the course as well as some of the off the course. But which players to have featured at the Masters have earned the most during their time competing in the tournament?

Analyzing historical data, we’ve revealed those who have earned the most per shot at the Masters, which of this year’s favorites have picked up the most money per stroke, which previous champions have earned the most from the tournament and which winning years saw the greatest earnings per shot.

Which Golfers Have Earned the Most Per Shot at the Masters?

Looking at the overall top-20 earners, nobody’s made more money per Masters golf shot than Will Zalatoris. The 25-year-old made his Masters debut in 2021, making an immediate impact on his route to finishing second - and picking up $4,609 for each stroke.

Next up, former PGA Tour golfer Len Mattiace has earned an incredible $2,900 per shot at the Masters, followed by 2015 winner Jordan Spieth ($2,842) and 23-year-old Sungjae Im ($2,547).

Icon of the game and five-time Masters winner Tiger Woods places fifth, recording $2,546 for every stroke he’s played at the exclusive tournament, trailed by Jonas Blixt ($1,986), three-time victor Phil Mickelson ($1,793) and 2020 champion Dustin Johnson ($1,699).

Squeezing into the all-time top 10 earners per Masters stroke, we have 2016 winner Danny Willett ($1,657) and Xander Schauffele ($1,646), while 2018 champion Patrick Reed ($1,579) and Tommy Tolles ($1,544) just miss out, having to settle for 11th and 12th, respectively.

Meanwhile, the top 20 list is completed by twice-winner Bubba Watson ($1,491), 2005 Masters runner-up Chris DiMarco ($1,475), 2021 champion Hideki Matsuyama ($1,404), twice runner-up Retief Goosen ($1,365), Thomas Pieters ($1,353), Jon Rahm ($1,338), 2020 runner-up Cameron Smith ($1,328) and two-time runner-up David Duval ($1,297).

Which of the 2022 Favorites Have Earned the Most Money Per Shot?

Turning our attention to the top-20 favorites for this year’s Masters tournament, Zalatoris once again tops the chart. His $4,609 is unmatched, with Spieth ($2,842) and Im ($2,547) his closest chasers.

Johnson and Schauffele place among the top-five Masters earners per shot, when comparing 2022 competitors, followed by Reed ($1,579), Hideki Matsuyama ($1,404), John Rahm ($1,338) and Cameron Smith ($1,328). Meanwhile, Brooks Koepka ($1,169) places 10th.

Next up, we have Tony Finau ($1,009) - who is also the final 2022 favorite to have earned over $1,000 per Masters stroke over the course of his career - while Rory McIlroy ($901), Justin Thomas ($783), Louis Oosthuizen ($732), and Scottie Scheffler ($565) are the remaining players to have earned over $500 per shot.

Rounding out the top 20 favorites, according to how much they’ve earned with every stroke at the Masters, Patrick Cantlay ($482) is joined by Daniel Berger ($408), Collin Morikawa ($367), Viktor Hovland ($216) and, finally, Bryson DeChambeau ($167).

Which Masters Champions Have Earned the Most Per Shot?

Of all the players to have ever won the Masters, Spieth has earned the most per shot taken in the tournament. Spieth’s $2,842 per stroke just beats out Woods’s $2,546, while Mickelson ($1,793), Johnson ($1,699) and Willett ($1,657) trail behind.

Meanwhile, Reed ($1,579) is the final player in this category to have earned over $1,500 per Masters stroke, with Bubba Watson ($1,491) and Matsuyama ($1,404) just falling short.

The top 10 in this category is rounded out by 2011 winner Charl Schwartzel ($1,193) and 2009 champion Angel Cabrera ($1,169) – who are, incidentally, the final two players to have earned over $1,000 per Masters shot so far – while twice-winner Jose Maria Olazabal ($964) and 2013 victor Adam Scott ($950) place just behind.

Finally, Sergio Garcia ($837), Trevor Immelman ($826), Zach Johnson ($780), Vijay Singh ($753), Mike Weir ($712), Nick Faldo ($613), Fred Couples ($567) and Bernhard Langer ($443) complete the top 20 previous winners by earnings per stroke at the Masters.

Which Masters Victories Have Been the Biggest Earners?

When comparing the earnings of players per Masters stroke in the year they won the tournament, Spieth takes the title, earning an incredible $8,499 for every shot he took in 2015. However, it’s close at the top, with Garcia’s 2017 win worth $8,441 per stroke.

Woods features four times, with his 2019 victory ranked third ($8,353), followed by his 2005 ($8,234), 2001 ($7,679) and 2002 ($7,309) outings, which place 6th, 14th and 20th, respectively.

Reed’s 2018 victory ($8,332) places fourth in this category, followed by Johnson’s 2020 ($8,279) win, while Immelman and Willett earned $7,836 and $7,832 in their 2008 and 2016 title winning years, respectively.

Like Woods, Mickelson features multiple times, with his 2004 ($7,830) and 2006 ($7,811) victories cracking the top ten, and his 2010 ($7,526) win placing 17th ($7,526).

Matsuyama ($7,709), Schwartzel ($7,697), Cabrera ($7,679), Zach Johnson ($7,598) and Weir ($7,430) all also make the top 20, while Watson features with both his Masters victories, in 2014 ($7,636) and 2012 ($7,328).

With the Masters just around the corner, it’ll be interesting to see if a new name is soon added to the list! For even more from our team of experts, check out the latest golf betting offers.

Methodology

To determine the biggest earners per shot at the Masters, we analyzed historical data from ESPN and Augusta.

Masters earnings for each competitor since 1934 were totaled and each golfer’s overall sum was divided by their total stroke count. This revealed their earnings per shot. Each golfer was then ranked.

We then filtered golfers out for each of the subsequent three factor-specific categories, depending on whether they fit the criteria.

To ensure accurate comparison between players, we accounted for the average inflation rate of 3.53% since the first Masters tournament, and adjusted earnings accordingly.

Mark spent over a decade as a sports reporter and editor with Goal.com and Bleacher Report. He is now a Content Editor at Bookmakers.com covering all manner of sports from the Premier League and cricket to the NBA and NFL.

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